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Crafts in France

Time for another of travel blog from Tina Dorr. Here, she gives us the lowdown on traditional and modern crafts in France…

France is a country steeped in traditional crafts, handed down generation by generation – from the master craftsmen such as stonemasons to families that love to make toys and household items out of wood. Go to any market or fete and you will find stalls that sell so many beautiful things that you would be at a loss as to what to buy first.

Wickerwork is very traditional and there are many beautiful baskets on sale. If you fancy one as a decorative piece, you can even buy some stunning dried flowers to put in them. They hang at the stalls in shades of blues, reds, yellows, lilacs and more, and are just so pretty.

Another popular and traditional craft is soap making and you can find soaps of all shapes and sizes in a range of wonderful perfumes, lavender being a huge seller. The fragrance is so strong they can scent a room.

At country fairs, you can still find old traditional crafts such as weaving, lace making, leatherwork and tapestry. Often, you can watch the craftspeople at work and it is fascinating to see such skill and see how things are made.

A lovely piece of upcycling!

As in the UK, other popular crafts in France include knitting, crocheting, painting and upcycling. Upcycling is big business here as you can buy good quality furniture cheaply from a ‘vide grenier’, upcycle it and sell it for a profit. (Vide grenier means ‘empty attic’ and is the French equivalent of car boot sales).

Sadly, from my point of view, papercraft is not huge in France, mainly I think because the French are not big on sending cards. Having said that… it does seem to be starting to take off, probably because of all us Brits that have bought houses here! I know of two large scrapbooking shops in Paris and you can now buy some things online. These are still quite expensive though – so thank goodness for Joanna Sheen!!

Our local hypermarket sells a small number of craft bits and pieces, but that is aimed more towards the children’s market. We also have a shop called Action that sells a lot of British stuff and has quite a large and not badly priced craft section.

I am certainly hoping that papercraft takes off more, in the meantime, I send my French friends and neighbours homemade cards and explain how I make them… You never know, I may get them interested yet!

 

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Christmas abroad

I am very keen on my traditional British Christmas – from stockings and trees to families and board games.
So how, I wonder, will any of our friends and family members who are living abroad be celebrating, probably in sweltering heat and beautiful sunshine.

My younger daughter will (I desperately hope) be given leave to come home for a few days, so I won’t have to ponder how Christmas Day is spent in Singapore. However one of the ladies that work here, now has two daughters living in Australia. I understand there will be much barbecuing, swimming and happy celebrating and they reckon Christmas is just as fun as in the UK.

I do contemplate the idea of a Christmas holiday somewhere hot like the Caribbean – may be a luxury cruise so I don’t have to cook – but I always end up shaking my head and muttering, “Nope, home is best!”

For anyone that has family or friends living far, far away, here are a couple of ideas for cards and remember it’s really early for the last posting date!

Smiles Joanna

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Heather and gorse – moorland beauties

From a distance, Dartmoor can seem rather gloomy and forbidding as Autumn draws in, but pause to look closer, and you’ll see that it is carpeted in the most lovely shades of purple, pink and yellow as heather and gorse combine to create a stunning patchwork.

Heather is also known as ‘Ling’ and you’ll find it on heathland, moorland, bogs and even woodland with acidic or peat soils. Its delicate pink flowers appear from August to October with the plants growing tightly packed together. Surprisingly, given the tough areas they seem to thrive in, heathers can live for up to 40 years or more!

Historically, heather has been used for many purposes, such as fuel, fodder, building materials, thatch, packing and ropes. It was also used to make brooms, which is how it got its Latin name – Callunais derived from the Greek word meaning ‘to brush’.

People have lived and worked on Dartmoor for thousands of years and managed the vegetation to produce what they need. Swaling (or burning) has been carried out by farmers from earliest times, as a way to clear scrub and improve grazing for sheep, cattle and ponies. Today, laws and regulations stipulate the time of year and even the time of day that swaling can take place – so very different from times gone by. An old farmer friend of mine recalls being sent out with a box of matches to swale nearby moorland with three friends, the oldest being 12 and the farmer himself 5! He said they did it every year without mishap and their parents trusted them to get on with the job, it wasn’t a game, and they all knew how to manage the burn – quite extraordinary!

The other star of the moorland landscape is gorse. Its vivid yellow flowers create a real splash of colour and, although I wouldn’t normally think to put pink and yellow together, in nature they look stunning against the dark green foliage. Gorse is a prickly character and can leave you with scratched legs should you walk through it, even in thick walking trousers!

Common Gorse can be seen in all kinds of habitats, from heaths and coastal grasslands to towns and gardens. Western Gorse, which is abundant on Dartmoor, flowers from July to November. Gorse provides shelter and food for many insects and birds, it’s spiky leaves creating an effective deterrent for even the nosiest dogs!

Traditionally, gorse was regularly collected from common land and, like heather, had all sorts of uses – including fuel for firing bread ovens, fodder for livestock and was used as a dye for painting Easter Eggs.

Common Gorse flowers a little in late autumn and through the winter, coming into flower most strongly in spring, while Western Gorse and Dwarf Gorse flower in Autumn. Between the different species, some gorse is almost always in flower, hence the old country phrase: “When gorse is out of blossom, kissing’s out of fashion”!

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Family Christmas cards

One of the things I enjoy most about receiving cards in the run-up to Christmas is the addition (hopefully) of up to date photos of my nephews and nieces, cousins and friends’ children. It’s just great to see their little smiling faces and it reminds me that Christmas is so much about family and friends.

This is a sample from my new cardmaking collection from Practical Publishing. The boxed set features one of our favourite artists – Jane Shasky. Her pads and CDs have sold in their thousands for us and she is a special favourite of mine.

The full steps are in the magazine that comes in the collection as are all the ingredients – oh yes, apart from the picture of little Grace! Obviously, you must insert one of your own special people, whether they are young, old or just middling!

 

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Sundays in rural France…

Time for another of Tina’s travel blogs, written by Tina Dorr. It’s fun to hear how different Sundays are in France, I wonder what our Sundays might be like if the shops and supermarkets weren’t open?

“Now that we live in rural France, we get to experience a completely different way of life that has its own special pace. It is very relaxed, and family orientated and, wherever you go, the roads are pretty clear and the scenery, beautiful.

Sundays in France are family time, a quiet time where shops are closed (unless you live in a tourist town) and people do things ‘en famille’. Sometimes, it is as simple as having friends and family round for lunch or going for a bike ride or, in the summer, it can be driving out to one of the many man-made beaches which children love.

One of the big things on a Sunday is going to a Vide Grenier, which means ‘empty attic’ and these are like car boot sales, except in France, whole streets are closed off to accommodate the many stalls and food vans.

At a Vide Grenier, you can find real treasures, such as antiques, furniture, toys, clothes, flowers, books, handmade carvings, soap and so much more. If you allow yourself a few hours, you can peruse the stalls, barter for goods, stop for a drink (beer seems very popular!) and have something to eat, which is usually sausage in a baguette or some chips. Entire families come along and leave laden down with their bargains. The Vide Grenier is truly a fun occasion; often having fairground rides, hook a duck, ice cream and candyfloss stalls too.

If you want something more relaxing to do, then the man-made beaches are beautiful. You can swim, sit on the sand, go for a boat ride, and with some, there is even pony riding and biking. There is always a nice café offering some shade, cool drinks and snacks, where you can sit and people watch.

Apart from the beach, they all have some sort of playground for the youngsters for when they tire of the sand. We took our little granddaughter to one at a place called Sillé-le-Guillaume which as well as the beach and all the other things mentioned, also had a petite train that takes you for a ride around the area, and the whole thing is surrounded by beautiful forest.

Once everyone has enjoyed their time, eaten their picnics and the day has drawn to a close, most people head home for dinner. In France, the main meal is always eaten at midday and so many restaurants don’t open in the evenings on a Sunday.”

 

 

 

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