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Is it a beach hut… or a shed?

I decided to do a blog about this card today to underline the flexibility of dies. Technically this is sold as a beach hut, (see my previous blog!) and very popular it is too, but I loved the use of it as a plain old garden shed. It fascinates me how a different paint job or colouring treatment or however you like to look at it, can turn it into something quite different.

I was reading an article the other day about ‘Man caves’ and thought how nice it must be for a husband to be able to choose everything without female input and have a little world that is completely his own. I offered Richard a shed down the garden and his response was: “What’s wrong with the garden shed we have now, it’s not full yet?” OK, he obviously doesn’t feel he needs a man cave, but time will tell!

However, in tandem with that article was one about ‘She sheds’ and it occurred to me how lovely it would be to have, say, a fairy garden interior, or whatever your favourite dream place is. I’m not sure if I have the time to do anything for now, but I do know I will be exploring the lovely ‘fairy door’ idea for spots in the garden to make sure Grace grows up with the same love of fairies and gardens as I have… Watch this space on the website is all I will say!

To go back to this card, the image was from ‘One Summer’s Day’ CD which features artwork by an American lady called Barbara Mock – such lovely designs on there, I do enjoy using it.

So how about a man’s card with a shed on it, or a card for a keen gardener with the door of the shed opening to have tools spilling out? So why not have a look at all your dies and ponder alternative uses for them!

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A pair of Thomas Kinkades!

One of the biggest licenses we have ever negotiated was the thrill of signing with Thomas Kinkade. Sadly he is not with us anymore but the legacy he left behind is mountain high. He is known as the Painter of Light and is the most collected contemporary artist in America.

I have recently been writing an article on his life story for a special magazine/box set that we are bringing out with Practical Publishing later in the year and he really did achieve so much.

We do a triple CD that has a great majority of his work on it – I wonder now if I should have brought it out in instalments, but I felt it was a special crafting CD to have in your collection with close to everything on it. There are so many topics he liked to paint, pretty cottages, gorgeous gardens and, my favourite, his marine paintings oh, and even a teddy bear!

These cards are made from the CD and the one on the right uses an insert as the backing paper which is always a useful trick to get even more out of your CDs. The card on the left has a lovely embellishment that’s easy for you to copy and create. Just layer a small part of a picture onto card and then cover with several coats of a glaze. You can use glossy accents, Crystal Glaze – there are many others out there too. Once it is complete, it looks like a pretty piece of enamelled jewellery and makes a great little embellishment.

Happy Crafting! Smiles, Joanna.

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My favourite Thomas Kinkade cards

We make gadzillions of cards through the year. Some are destined to be samples or demos for Create and Craft, some are just for family and friends. But these two cards are among my favourites and I have kept them carefully for months now. You know what it’s like when you have cards that should go somewhere or be for a particular someone and you think, no, I’ll keep those for now… and then never give them away!

Thomas Kinkade images are easy to use as the cottages are gentle and rural, pretty and easy to match colour-wise. The die used here is our Signature die Wild Rose (completely biased now) – and it is one of our best sellers of all time. I just LOVE it.

My personal choice is to die cut in white and then colour with Promarkers, or you can use any colouring medium that you prefer. You can add pearls, or not add pearls, ring the changes and it makes any card look fabulous with very limited effort!

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Tom Mielko – for romantics everywhere!

One of my favourite artists over the years that we have been licensing is Tom Mielko. Based in Santa Barbara, California, his work is mainly coastal images especially of Nantucket on the Eastern Coast. I just love the romance in all the pictures we licensed – there’s a Tom Mielko project book on the website if this is your sort of style!

Here we have an anniversary card – just plain and not too sophisticated to copy, it shows (I think) a very subtle but romantic idea of a couple cycling together. I’m not sure if Richard would think it was romantic if I joined him on his frequent cycle rides, but then he is thinking more about keep fit than sightseeing!

I think this card demonstrates that if you have a beautiful image, there’s a wide range of occasions you can use it for – this could work for a man’s birthday, anniversary as we have used it here, female birthday or anytime card and so the list goes on!

Happy cycling – err I mean cardmaking! Smiles, Joanna

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Quirky museums for Easter holiday fun

The year seems to be galloping by and, tomorrow, it will be April! If you find yourself looking for a way to entertain youngsters during the school holidays, why not try some of the country’s more quirky museums? There are some amazing ones around – have a Google and you’ll see. I’ve picked out a few ‘interesting’ ones that you might like to visit…

(Click on the museum names to visit their websites).

The Dog Collar Museum

Copyright: Leeds Castle.

I absolutely had to include this museum! Leeds Castle (which is in Kent, not Leeds) has a unique collection of historic and fascinating dog collars that is now the largest of its kind on public display anywhere in the world.

The colossal collection of canine neckwear, spanning five centuries, is fun for children and adults alike. There are over 130 rare and valuable collars with the earliest dating back to the late 15th century – a Spanish iron herd mastiff’s collar, which would have been worn for protection against wolves and bears roaming Europe at the time.

Other collars range from 16th-century German iron collars with fearsome spikes to ornate gilt collars of the Baroque period, through to finely-chased nineteenth century silver collars and twentieth century examples fashioned from tyres, beads and plastic.

Museum of Witchcraft and Magic

Copyright: Museum of Witchcraft and Magic.

Located in the picturesque Cornish harbour of Boscastle, this museum was started in 1960 and is now one of the most visited museums in the Westcountry. It claims to have the world’s largest collection of items relating to witchcraft, magic and the occult. Exhibitions change regularly so there’s always something new to see. 2017 boasts an exhibition of ‘poppets, pins and power: the craft of cursing’, which sounds well worth a visit! Being in such a lovely coastal setting, there’s plenty to see and do as well as explore this mysterious museum.

The Bakelite Museum

Copyright: The Bakelite Museum, above, and main header.

Anyone who has clocked up their half century will have come across Bakelite! The first proper plastic, Bakelite was a revolutionary material. It enabled mass-production and was known as ‘the material of a thousand uses’ and, in various guises, was used by everybody. The museum is an enormous collection of vintage plastics, from the earliest experimental materials to 1970s kitsch. It includes Bakelite objects in a huge variety of shapes, colours and functions – radios, telephones, eggcups, musical instruments, toys, tie-presses and even a coffin. There are also domestic and work related things from the Bakelite era, mainly the 1920s to the 1950s, and the whole collection is a nostalgic treat, a vintage wonderland and an educational eye-opener.

The exhibits are displayed in an atmospheric 18th-century watermill, in the heart of the beautiful Somerset countryside between Taunton, Minehead and Bridgewater. Williton Station, on the West Somerset Railway, the longest stretch of restored steam railway in the country, is just a 20-minute walk away. They also serve Somerset cream teas – so what’s not to love about this museum as a great day out!

Gnome World

Copyright: Gnome Reserve.

Yes, really! This north Devon attraction promises ‘a completely unique 100% fun experience, simultaneously 100% ecologically interesting, with an extra 100% wonder and magic mixed in’.

Set between Bideford and Bude, the 1000+ gnomes and pixies reside in a lovely 4 acre-reserve, with woodland, stream, pond, meadow and garden. Visitors will be delighted to learn that gnome hats are loaned free of charge together with fishing rods and you are encouraged to embarrass the family with some truly memorable photos for the family album!

The House of Marbles

Copyright: House of Marbles.

I don’t know why most of these museums are in the Westcountry, I was looking nationwide… goodness knows what it says about those of us that live down here! Anyway, I absolutely must give a final mention to The House of Marbles, here in Bovey Tracey, Devon, owned by some old friends of mine. Whenever you look up unusual museums or great places to visit – the House of Marbles is up there at the top of the list. No less than three museums, an enormous marble run and the chance to see glass being blown, it’s a great place to visit whatever your age. Oh, and it also has a very popular restaurant and great shops!

Have fun!

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