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Rainy birthday!

Rainy birthday? Oh dear… It would be nice if there was a rule of Nature that it never rained on your birthday… nope not happening. If it didn’t rain on anybody’s birthday, we’d live in a desert Joanna, be sensible! But it does always seem sad when you wake (as I did this year) on your birthday to hear rain pelting against the glass of your bedroom windows!

However, with luck the younger generations think rain is fun and like dancing in puddles and this is reflected in this lovely birthday card.

The teddies are from a great pack of decoupage that has a lot of occasions covered. The John Bindon set of decoupage has so many different occasions that it could help with card ideas. It’s temporarily on offer on the website at the moment, so that’s a fair bit of inspiration for £4.99 as well as £5 saving. See I knew we saved money by being cardmakers!

The backing paper is from Volume 1 of my collection of backing papers and the umbrella die is (SD157) from the Signature dies range, unsurprisingly called Umbrella! It’s a quick and easy card to make and hopefully your recipient won’t need an umbrella on their birthday!

 

 

 

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Birthday Brollies and Boots!

I thought these cards paired rather well together – brollies and boots – British weather and all that. So one card features rain clouds (we may just have had some of those this summer) and the other the pretty lacy wellies in the Signature Die collection.

First, the sweet little card that uses an image from the Donald Zolan (pad 2) collection. She’s a dear little girl and I love the children’s innocence in his artwork. The card measures 8 inches square and uses the Signature dies Lace Parasol die. The clouds are from the Signature Dies ‘Weather Forecast’ die, as are the raindrops.

The other card is also 8 inches square and uses backing papers from our backing paper collection (Volume 3) and then obviously the Wellies using the Signature die ‘Lacy Wellington’. The flower pots are also die cut (SD025 Flower Pots) and then pieces snipped from Signature dies Climbing Rose and Trailing Ivy filled up the pots!

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Crafting with Granny

One of the joys of our hobby is being able to share, whether it’s sharing the making of cards with family and friends or just giving them the finished product!

This weekend I was playing with my little granddaughter Grace. She absolutely loves ponies and regularly rides a little Shetland pony called Pippin. Her mother has a lovely grey called Bobby and Grace has grown up thinking everyone has to clean up after horses and wears wellies most of the time!

So knowing her passion for all things horse related, rather than playing yet again with her model stable, we decided to do some cardmaking. I have a little box and a drawer which I am slowly saving things in when I spot something that might be fun for her to use.

The Cuttlebug is ideal for children and even this little 3 year old can turn the handle if you hold the machine steady for her. We have a couple of suitable horsey dies in the Signature Dies range, so they have been waiting in the drawer for some time!

Poor old Bobby got kicked by another horse and is confined to his stable on box rest until his leg heals. So we made him a get well soon card!

Grace is definitely a chip off the old block, so to speak, she chose colours beautifully, and is very good already at accurately wielding the glue dispenser. I did the double sided taping, more for speed than anything, but soon I am sure she will manage with a tape dispenser. We die cut many more horses than we needed (ok so she wouldn’t stop and I didn’t like to halt the enthusiasm!) and included those inside the card “so Mummy can play with them” – think of it as alternative confetti to put inside a card!

The front you can see here in the picture, inside we used a Get Well Soon die and wrote a message for Bobby. The grass is made by using the Icicle border die. This design could be used with any of the animal families we have, so it could be a dog card, farm card or whatever you like!

 

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Giving it some welly!

When you live in the real countryside, ’sensible’ outdoor footwear is something of a necessity. True Devonians will always smile and say you can ‘spot the incomer’ a mile off by their inappropriate choices of heels, open toed or pale coloured shoes. You can buy all sorts of fancy boots but, at the end of the day, the wellington boot is the countryman’s footwear of choice!
WellyDrain

I shared this fun photo (right) on Facebook this week as it made me smile and think that Albert, the lead male in our Swaddlecombe Mysteries, would find this a good use of a leaking welly. In contrast, Victoria, our leading lady, would probably use a pair of old wellies as planters for some organic herbs…

So what’s the history of the wellington boot? How did this rubberised footwear come into being? The wellington boot is associated with Arthur Wellesley, the first Duke of Wellington (1769-1852). The Iron Duke, as he was known, instructed his shoemaker, George Hoby to modify his hessian 18th-century boot and make it out of calfskin leather.

WellyMontageWellingtons first appeared in 1817 and proved popular with the troops because they were hard wearing for battle, yet comfortable for evening wear. The boot leather was treated with wax to make them softer and more waterproof. The new boots became a very popular fashion accessory for gentlemen. Considered fashionable and foppish in the best circles, they remained the main fashion for men throughout the 1840s.

American, Charles Goodyear (1800-1860), who invented a vulcanisation process for rubber, began making rubber boots. Hiram Hutchinson saw the potential for agricultural workers in France and bought the patent from Goodyear in 1852. The new waterproof boots were quick to become established and sold well within the large rural population. Amazingly, by 1857 the company were hand–making 14,000 pairs of boots per day!

Fellow American, Henry Lee Norris, moved to Edinburgh and started producing rubber wellington boots in 1856. Norris believed Scotland was a good place to manufacture wellingtons because of the country’s high rainfall – good decision! He founded the British Rubber Company and four former boot–makers from New York trained the Scottish workforce The company went into production first making rubber shoes and boots and then quickly expanding to produce an extensive range of rubber products, included tyres, golf balls and hot water bottles.

Come the outbreak of the First World War (1914- 1918) the trench war ensured high production of rubber boots and again, in the Second World War, the armed forces used vast quantities of rubber wellington boots.

And so to today, when the Wellington boot has gone full circle and become highly fashionable again. When I was a child, wearing wellies was deemed very boring. They were always plain black and not very comfy and you would go out of your way to avoid wearing them. Now, when we are so sophisticated with technology coming out of our ears, I find it amusing that something as simple as old-fashioned as a boot made out of rubber is so much in demand. You can have them in various designs and in any colour and, if you choose green ones, you can even spend a fortune on them!

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