Welcome to my Country Days Blog!

I’ve lived in Devon for over 30 years and while I spend most of my time working in my studio, or in front of a TV camera or on an exhibition stand, country living does give me some time and space… to think about my next project!

A crafter in the country is never bored – nature is a huge treasure trove! Beachcombing, walking on Dartmoor, or rummaging about in hedgerows (while Richard pretends not to notice) produces all sorts of goodies. Shells, feathers, wildflowers, leaves – natural things are so often the ‘light bulb moment’ that gives me an idea for something new!

I have hundreds – actually, make that thousands ­– of ideas and projects from crafts to cookery to flowers that I thought I could share with you through a weekly country-inspired blog.

I love hearing from fellow crafters and swapping ideas and useful hints and tips, so do please feedback your comments on my blog, I’m sure it will be a lot of fun!

Peaches and Cream

I just love this rubber stamp – in fact I love the whole range of fruity/kitchen/recipe stamps we have. This particular stamp is from a sheet called Spiced Peaches and has a lovely recipe included as well.

The design idea behind this card is such an easy one for you to have a go with – just using a die cut shape – stamp the image and colour (go Promarkers!) and then soften the edges with some of the Old Paper or other soft beige Distress Ink pads.

While we are talking Distress Ink pads – many of you will have tried to use them with the Inkessentials Blending Tool – which is a good piece of kit, but I have to say I have found the Inkylicious Duster brushes so much easier. The brushes come in a set of three and they have made me a lot keener to use the Distress Inks around the edge of my cards and I agree this can add a lovely texture and effect. Now I feel happy that I can achieve it with no blips I am doing it so much more often!

Soft, pretty cards are always well received, as I am sure this one would be… of course if you were feeling really generous you could make a jar of spiced peaches as a gift to go with the car… or not!

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Busy bees

Spending so much time with flowers over the years, I’m a great respecter of bees. When you’re in your garden, it’s rare not to hear their gentle drone. I would never keep bees and respect them though I do… no way could I have ‘pet’ bees!

The big, slow moving bumble bee doesn’t produce much honey but it is an important pollinator. The smaller honey bee not only pollinates but also toils away to produce honey from the pollen it collects.

I knew bees were vital, but I was surprised when I read that one in three mouthfuls of the food we eat is dependent on pollination – so worrying when we are told that honeybee numbers have fallen by up to 30% in recent years

Honey, and the bees that create it, are both pretty amazing! Honeybees are the only insects to produce food for humans and honey is the only food that includes all the substances necessary to sustain life, including enzymes, vitamins, minerals, and water.

And wow, do ‘worker’ honey bees deserve their name! The average worker bee produces about one twelfth of a teaspoon of honey in her lifetime. She visits 50 to 100 flowers during a collection trip… and as you will have gathered it is the female of the species that does all the work!

Larger than the worker bees, the male honey bees (also called drones), have no stinger and do no work at all. All they do is mate. Now there’s a surprise!! (Sorry all you guys that read the blog……..)

 

 

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Harvesting your herbs…

After all the rain we’ve had, my herbs have grown absolutely HUGE and could do with cutting back. Last week I received an email asking me how best to dry lavender… and I thought – aha, time for a blog on drying herbs!

Cutting back overgrown herbs, leaves you with masses of fragrant and tasty cuttings that are far too good to be thrown away. Drying them is a brilliant way to add flavour to your cooking outside the herb growing season and save money.

Drying herbs

Living plants contain large amounts of water – as much as seven eighths of their weight in many cases – and his has to be removed before they can be stored.

Tie bunches of leaves and flowers loosely together in bundles and hang in a clean, airy, place out of direct sun until brittle enough to break easily between your fingers. A good tip is to hold a bunch together with an elastic band rather than string, then it shrinks as the stalks dry out and stops them dropping on the floor. They usually take about a week to dry if the weather is warm enough.

However… given the summer we are ‘enjoying’ in the UK this year, you may need to use an airing cupboard, shaded greenhouse, warm attic or dry ventilated shed.

Herbs can also be dried in a domestic oven or dehydrator, but you need to keep the temperature at no more than 32ºC/90ºF for the first day or two, after which reduce to 25ºC/75ºF until the process is complete – between three and five days. Turn the material occasionally and complete one batch at a time – don’t be tempted to add fresh material as this will reduce the temperature and raise humidity. I personally prefer the hanging in bunches method AND it looks lovely in the house!

Bunching several herbs together for bouquet garnis is easier before drying then after.

Handy tip: Culinary herbs cut up small and packed in measured amounts with water in ice-cube trays lose little of their flavour when frozen and are ready for almost immediate use!

 

 

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Elderflower Delight

Goodness me – have we got a delicious treat for you this week! Writing pal and foraging guru Julia Horton-Powdrill has come up with this absolutely gorgeous reciped for ElderFlower Delight. What a lovely change from the usual Turkish variety and another great use for wonderful edlerflower. Thank you Julia!

Elderflower Delight

You will need: 

  • 25g leaf gelatine
  • 25 heads of elderflowers
  • 700g granulated sugar
  • 400ml water
  • 130g cornflour
  • 30g icing sugar
  • Juice of two lemons 

Soak the gelatine in a shallow dish of cold water to soften. Strip the blossom from the stems and tie loosely in a piece of muslin leaving one piece of string long.

Put granulated sugar, lemon juice and 300ml water in a heavy-based saucepan, heat gently until sugar is dissolved, then leave to cool.

Mix 100g of the cornflour with the remaining 100ml water until smooth, then stir into lemon/sugar syrup. Return the saucepan to a low heat. Squeeze gelatine to remove excess water, then add to mixture. Whisk until dissolved.

Bring mixture very slowly to the boil and simmer for 10 minutes, stirring almost continuously to prevent the mixture sticking. Suspend the muslin bag in the mixture and simmer, still stirring, for a further 15 minutes. Give muslin bag an occasional squeeze with back of spoon to release Elderflower fragrance. The mixture will gradually clarify and become extremely gloopy. When ready, leave to cool for 10 minutes.

Mix remaining 30g cornflour with icing sugar. Line a shallow baking tin, about 20cm square, with baking parchment and dust with a heaped tablespoonful of the icing sugar and cornflour mixture. Remove the muslin bag from the gloopy mixture, then pour it into baking tin and place in a cool place (not the fridge) to set.

Refrigerate for a few hours until it becomes rubbery. Cut the Elderflower Delight into cubes with a knife or scissors and dust with the remaining icing sugar and cornflour. Enjoy!

To see more of Julia’s wonderful recipes and foraging tips, go to: www.facebook.com/WildAboutPembrokeshire

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Velvet and Lace

My favourite cards always involve something feminine and this example is definitely a favourite! I love the effect you can achieve with the lace stamps (there are several to choose from on the web site) and the mixture of parchment, velvet, lace and flowers is wonderful. Those hydrangeas from my garden look pretty too don’t they – thank you photographer!

The way to get one of the best effects from the lace stamps is to choose a “detail white” embossing powder, stamp with a Versamark pad and then sprinkle with the embossing powder – tap to clear any excess and then heat emboss. This is an easy task once you have the hang of it – using parchment I always heat from the back so I can see the changes taking place and move the heat along to prevent burning/overheating etc.

Both the backing paper under the parchment and the main image come from the Jane Shasky CD – “From the Heart of the Garden” – if you haven’t had a look through the contents do go to the website and click on the videos section where you will find a wander through all of our videos – worth looking before you buy!

So I will go back to admiring my hydrangeas out of the window and see what we can come up with for next week’s blog!

 

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