Welcome to my Country Days Blog!

I’ve lived in Devon for over 30 years and while I spend most of my time working in my studio, or in front of a TV camera or on an exhibition stand, country living does give me some time and space… to think about my next project!

A crafter in the country is never bored – nature is a huge treasure trove! Beachcombing, walking on Dartmoor, or rummaging about in hedgerows (while Richard pretends not to notice) produces all sorts of goodies. Shells, feathers, wildflowers, leaves – natural things are so often the ‘light bulb moment’ that gives me an idea for something new!

I have hundreds – actually, make that thousands ­– of ideas and projects from crafts to cookery to flowers that I thought I could share with you through a weekly country-inspired blog.

I love hearing from fellow crafters and swapping ideas and useful hints and tips, so do please feedback your comments on my blog, I’m sure it will be a lot of fun!

Dowsing – discredited medieval practice, or useful skill?

Dowsing on Dartmoor!

As you probably know by now, I am interested in traditional remedies and ancient beliefs. I like to keep an open mind and try and discover whether things might be true or not, rather than just dismissing them out of hand. I’ve always been fascinated by dowsing, or water divining, and was reminded to look into this ancient practice last week when I drove past a sign for a dowsing convention in deepest Dartmoor! Actually, given it is such an ancient and fascinating landscape, I shouldn’t have been that surprised… What did surprise me, once I started looking into it, is that there is no scientific evidence that dowsing works – I had always thought there was.

Dowsing is a type of ‘divination’ used to locate ground water, buried metals or ores, gemstones, oil, gravesites and many other objects and materials without the use of scientific apparatus. Dowsers, or water witchers, claim that their divining rods cross over when the presence of water is detected below ground. It is regarded as a pseudoscience after numerous studies showed it was no better than chance at finding water.

A Y-shaped twig or rod, or two L-shaped ones — individually called a dowsing rod, divining rod or witching rod — are usually used for dowsing. The scientific explanation for what happens when people dowse is that ‘ideomotor movements’ – muscle movements caused by subconscious mental activity – make anything held in the hands move. It looks and feels as if the movements are involuntary.

Dowsing has been around for a long time and originated in Germany in the 16thCentury. In 1662, dowsing was declared to be ‘superstitious, or rather satanic’ by a Jesuit, Gaspar Schott, though he later noted that he wasn’t sure that the devil was always responsible for the movement of the rod! Nothing like sitting on the fence! In the South of France in the 17th century, it was used in tracking criminals and heretics. Its abuse led to a decree of the Inquisition in 1701, forbidding its employment for purposes of justice.

And there you have it – a bit of a cranky practice with no place in today’s world. But hold on a minute… in 2017, 10 of the 12 water companies in the UK admitted they are still using dowsing despite the lack of scientific evidence for its effectiveness! This discovery was made by the science blogger Sally Le Page after her parents reported seeing an engineer from Severn Trent Water “walking around holding two bent tent pegs to locate a pipe” near their home in Stratford-upon-Avon. The disclosure prompted calls for the regulator, OFWAT, to stop companies passing the cost of a ‘discredited medieval practice’ on to their customers. Extraordinary!

Some water companies, however, insisted the practice could be as effective as modern methods. Sally Le Page asked Severn Trent why it was still using divining rods to find pipes when there was no evidence that it worked. Replying on Twitter, the company said: “We’ve found that some of the older methods are just as effective than the new ones, but we do use drones as well, and now satellites.” Well, that’s all right then!

Photo credits:

Top image:
Photo credit: <a href=”https://visualhunt.com/re/91c89d”>Visual Hunt</a>

Water witcher: 
Photo credit: <a href=”https://visualhunt.com/author/8f7aff”>State Library and Archives of Florida</a> on <a href=”https://visualhunt.com/re/6ba9d8″>Visual Hunt</a> / <a href=”http://flickr.com/commons/usage/”> No known copyright restrictions</a>

Woodcut: 
Photo credit: <a href=”https://visualhunt.com/author/b0d021″>Jeff Dray</a> on <a href=”https://visualhunt.com/re/f771b4″>VisualHunt</a> / <a href=”http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/”> CC BY-SA</a>

Group dowsing: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/

 

 

 

 

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Ways to use corner dies

Corner dies can seem rather small, insignificant little dies to add to your collection – but never underestimate the jobs they can do.

The first is a bit of a no-brainer, obviously, they can decorate a corner for you – either in a single corner of your card or several corners.

Secondly, of course, you can decorate all four corners on a suitably sized card so the points of each corner meet and voila! you have a pretty frame.

Use number three – see the card with the oval centre – they can just be really handy squiggles (technical term there!) that add a great embellishment.

Number four – line the diecuts up nose to tail so to speak and you can make a gorgeous border to go across or down your card.

Number five is illustrated in the card above left – mix some corner dies up together and create a frame for your topper.

I’m sure there’s a number six, seven and eight – but they escape me just for today – but have a look at the corners you have or treat yourself to one of the new corners we launched not long ago and see just how versatile they can be.

Here’s a link to the section of Signature Dies on our website where you’ll find all the corners.

 

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Where has the year gone?

A summer’s day on Dartmoor.

I am sure I say this every year… but where has the year gone? I am writing this on 21st June, the Summer Solstice, the longest day. As of tomorrow, the days will start getting shorter.

When I woke up this morning (it gets light so early) I almost felt like jumping out of bed and yelling: “STOP!” I am just not ready for July to arrive. I feel as if the year has only just got going and we are already at the halfway point. I know it is ridiculous but, as you get older, time does seem to fly. I can remember my school summer holidays feeling endless whereas now, Spring has passed in the blink of an eye and Summer seems over before it’s begun. Ah well… it was ever thus, and I must make the most of the good weather and find some time to appreciate my garden.

June 24th is Midsummer Day; traditionally the midpoint of the growing season – halfway between planting and harvesting – and my garden is certainly looking blousy and full. My roses are looking fabulous, so it will be no surprise to know that the rose is the birth flower for June. Actually, there are TWO flowers for June – the rose and the honeysuckle. A rose generally indicates love or desire. Specific roses may relate other messages, for example, a white rose may mean ‘new beginnings,’ while a yellow rose signifies ‘jealousy.’ The honeysuckle denotes the bonds of love or generous and devoted affection. All in all, June is a luscious and loving month and very popular for weddings!

I visited an open gardens event in a nearby village last weekend, it was inspiring to see all these different gardens so lovingly tended. You cannot fail to pick up at least one design idea or spot a plant that you absolutely must have… if only you could think of the name of it! The colour and scent of the roses in bloom in these gardens were fabulous. From climbers making beautiful arches to rambling roses draped over old sheds and barns, to a stunning standard rose, the like of which I haven’t seen since I was a child. Roses seemed to go out of fashion for a while, but they certainly seem to be back with a vengeance now.

Roses feature a lot in my cards, in artwork as well as dies, and they must surely be one of, if not THE, most popular flower in this country – we talk about a beautiful woman as being an ‘English rose’ after all. So, make the most of flaming June while you still can and let’s keep our fingers crossed that the remainder of the Summer is mild and gentle too.

 

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Thomas Kinkade in pastel shades

I am loving our new Thomas Kinkade pads – the images are extremely well chosen (pat on the back for me!) as all his images are great, but some are even greater than others! I enjoy the new format with backing papers being included in the pad as it makes my life so easy when I am planning a card.

The card on the right is embellished with our recently launched Versailles corner die. Many of the corners we design are brilliant for – yes just corners – but you can also line them up and make stunning borders or other shapes that make those dies so much more flexible than ‘just’ corners.

Both cards are suitable for either sex – that’s one of the bonuses about the Thomas Kinkade pads – they are suitable for many occasions and both sexes. But it has to be said I did think “Oh left hand one for a female and right hand one for a male!” – but hey nowadays men are quite entitled to like pink, pretty cards!

Sentiments are another item included on the sheets – just so handy as although I can create sentiments on Microsoft Word, or whatever, and of course, have dies and peel offs galore, these just make life even easier. It’s wonderful to just snip round a completely matching little rectangle and if I want to layer it up I do and ta-da … perfect embellishment!

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Peppa Pig World!

Peppa Pig was never meant to be this big!

I thought it would be fun to post a little story about our recent trip to Peppa Pig World. Richard and I went with my daughter Pippa (no not Peppa!), her husband Dave and of course little Grace – who at 4 was, I felt, at a perfect age to try some gentle rides and meet Peppa Pig ‘in person’!

Well, let’s start with the initial greeting from the star herself – a giant Peppa Pig standing poised on a balcony to meet the children as they arrived. She was very big and, of course, being up high made her even bigger. I introduced Grace whose lip quivered and she wailed: “She’s too big I’m scared”… so that wasn’t such a good start!

A nice little tame ride with Mummy and Daddy…

There were several little rides (VERY tame) with 20+ minute queues and, it has to be said, it was a very hot day, Grace got quieter and quieter and then said she had a tummy ache. I translated this as anxiety developing and was sad that our day didn’t seem to be working out as planned. So, we wandered away from the safe rides and over to a VERY tall and (to my eyes) scary looking wavy slide where you got nice and wet and Richard asked her if she was brave enough to go on. Overprotective Granny here wouldn’t have suggested it for the world but yup, apparently Grandpa knows best and she trusts him.

Standing at the bottom with her parents I waited anxiously – 50% of the children leaving the slide were screaming and scared. I had now given up on anything working out that day. HOWEVER… Grace was beaming from ear to ear as she left the slide and could only say “Again, again!”

This was a bit more exciting as it involved water!

This was the start of a very smiley little girl’s day – we ventured into the main park and, all pretence at keeping to the small safe rides having gone – she was extremely happy. The highlight of the day was a ride on a fearsome looking roller coaster – you know the kind where you are strapped in and your feet dangle? Again Granny sat at the base and quivered, counting the seconds until all the rest of the family got off the ride and worrying about Grace… “Again, again!” she said and went on the ride with Grandpa!

It seems at age 4 ¾ we have a budding roller coaster junkie – bodes well for a trip to Disney in the future – and Richard is very happy to have company on scary rides. I am such a wuss, the teacups make me feel queasy, tall rides, fast rides – whatever it is I am just rubbish!

This Granny-scary roller coaster was deemed the most exciting hing ever!

So I was delighted that it turned out to be the happiest of days! I will also add that if you are going with extremely small children, the toilet facilities, feeding and changing rooms were amazing. I have never seen such a clean place – well done Peppa Pig World!

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